Day: 18 October 2011

Suicide Squad 2 (December 2011)

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Suicide Squad is still absolutely terrible, but it’s so much better this issue than the first.

And it surmounts the amazing art problems. It appears Federico Dallocchio and Andrei Bressan split the responsibilities, as the style changes drastically every couple pages. One is dark and ominous, the other is goofy and cartoony. The panels are awful to see.

And Deadshot’s new costume is ludicrous.

But Glass manages to move it along. He comes up with some surprises, though he clearly gets bored with a lot of his cast. King Shark or whatever doesn’t even need to be in the comic, since Glass doesn’t know how to do comic relief. He also doesn’t make Deadshot a strong enough team leader.

But, like I said, it’s a lot better than the first issue. At this rate, by issue fifty-two, it might even be mediocre.

Okay, maybe not. Maybe by issue 152.

CREDITS

When the Levee Breaks; writer, Adam Glass; artists, Federico Dallocchio and Andrei Bressan; colorists, Val Staples, Allen Passalaqu and Hi-Fi; letterer, Jared K. Fletcher; editors, Sean Mackiewicz and Pat McCallum; publisher, DC Comics.

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Ape City 3 (October 1990)

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The art gets worse this issue. I wonder what Wyman’s pencils look like without inks. From a few panels, I wonder if he even bothered with full faces. Adventure really didn’t put much effort into their Apes comics as far as the art (Wyman, at one point, being the exception).

But Ape City is almost engaging enough it should have been the flagship. Marshall mixes all the elements–mob apes, ninja apes, biker apes and a bunch of violent Americans–quite well. They just don’t belong in a limited series. He needs room to let them relax and expand.

The highly touted (by Marshall) explanation of Adventure’s Apes sequels is, sadly, not worth much touting. It’s kind of expected and there’s little or nothing revelatory about it. With these European apes (Marshall skips explaining what happened to different languages,) so amusing, why bother with the boring American Iron Age ones?

Resurrection Man 2 (December 2011)

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And I thought Abnett and Lanning did a bad job the first issue….

The second issue does feature one amusing, if derivative, element. Resurrection Man gets a sidekick in a senile old man who might have been a supervillain. It could work out to be funny. But not with these writers.

This issue features Abnett and Lanning writing female characters. I think DC must have an edict its new line only has terrible writing of women.

The story itself, some of it, isn’t particularly bad. Resurrection Man goes to find his dad, finds a mystery (a tepid one, but still) instead. Then the supervillain girls show up and it gets really stupid.

Worse, artist Dagnino has a lot of failings in terms of faces this issue. The comic, at brief glance, appears to have good superhero art. But on actual reading, it’s clear Dagnino has problems with detail.

Terrible stuff.

CREDITS

And Gone; writers, Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning; artist, Fernando Dagnino; colorist, Santi Arcas; letterer, Rob Leigh; editors, Rex Ogle and Eddie Berganza; publisher, DC Comics.

Ape City 2 (September 1990)

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Interesting.

I don’t know what else to say about this issue of Ape City except… interesting. Imagine me sort of pensively scratching my chin as I think.

Marshall, besides making a… ahem… big King Kong reference, introduces Charlton Heston’s character’s daughter. She’s come to the future to make things better once her dad shows up. Marshall needs to explain his timeline to the reader, a big problem on the regular Apes series too, and his characterization of her is a little slight.

But he does manage to confound with the intricacies of his plot machinations, as opposed to just being confused.

He’s also reduced his cast to a mismatched team of misfits, which always reads well, on the run from three sets of bad guys. The silly factor, even with a giant ape, is down a little from the first issue too.

I just wish Mann was a better inker.

Grifter 2 (December 2011)

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For most of the issue, Edmondson’s Grifter is just an alien conspiracy action thriller with the protagonist ludicrously wearing a bandana on his face.

As far as that genre goes, it’s fine. Cafu and Jason Gorder are a little off with some of the figure drawing, but not often, and it moves well. Edmondson’s not trying to reinvent the wheel, he’s just doing an action movie as a comic.

Until the end, when he gets into the stupid. Maybe his big reveal seemed like a good idea back when he was outlining the series to his editors, but it’s a terrible idea and the execution of it is even worse. Because it’s not an original idea; it’s been in some very famous Westerns. Edmondson had plenty of reference material for how to make it work successfully. Instead, he goes on his own.

And, with that failing, Grifter stops being amusing.

CREDITS

The Advantage Angle; writer, Nathan Edmondson; penciller, Cafu; inker, Jason Gorder; colorist, Andrew Dalhouse; letterer, Wes Abbott; editors, Katie Kubert and Bobbie Chase; publisher, DC Comics.

Ape City 1 (August 1990)

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There used to be a cable network with chimps doing scenes from old movies. Ape City is a lot like those commercials. But Marshall does make it mildly compelling because of the threat factor. He introduces a bunch of time traveling humans sent from the past to kill apes in the future. It’s not to prevent the world from being overrun with apes, it’s just meant to be vicious and kill apes.

It seems like a realistic taking human nature into account.

There’s some really weak dialogue—Marshall’s trying to distinguish his characters’ speaking and he fails miserably. None of the characters are particularly strong either. Actually, instead of a comic book featuring a narrative, Ape City would work better as an annotated description of M.C. Wyman’s character designs. Why this ape looks this way and so on.

Ape City’s okay, but nowhere near as charming as Marshall thinks.