Tag Archive: Gerry Conway

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 49 (July 1986)

It’s sort of a goofy issue, with Firestorm’s lawsuit ending in the first scene, then the rest of the issue is the Moonbow story. Conway continues the Marvel vibe–maybe it’s because Moonbow (a… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 48 (June 1986)

Firestorm hasn’t cratered or anything so severe, but Conway does seem to have found a new level for the book. It’s a little low, sure, but he’s hitting it consistently. And even though… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 47 (May 1986)

It’s not a bad special guest star issue, just another pointless one. Blue Devil and Firestorm are now teamed up–after a couple issues of mistaken fighting–against all of Firestorm’s villains. Brozowski continues to… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 46 (April 1986)

Joe Brozowski appears to be taking over as regular penciller. He does okay; he tries real hard with expressions, which don’t tend to work out with the regular people but it’s fine with… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 45 (March 1986)

It's funny, but George Tuska really brings the book around. He's just filling in, but Conway's got Multiplex (Firestorm's foe since the second issue of the original series) getting all the villains together–although… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man Annual 3 (November 1985)

Akin and Garvey’s inks are a little better this issue. Not much, but a little. There are a lot of action sequences and most of them come off well, as does Firestorm’s trip… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 44 (February 1986)

It’s Conway’s most ambitious issue in a long time. The first third of the issue is Firestorm versus a natural disaster–a freak tornado in Pittsburgh. Of course, Typhoon is creating the tornado to… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 43 (January 1986)

What is it about Kayanan? Why does he never gets the right inker on Firestorm? Mike Machlan is better than the last couple guys, but still not great. For a lot of the… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 42 (November 1985)

It’s a thoroughly decent Crisis crossover. Firehawk and Wonder Girl are trying to find loved ones in New York and they run into all sorts of problems since New York City is split… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 41 (November 1985)

The issue is simultaneously likable and shallow. The first half has Firestorm moving the Pittsburgh and Conway introducing the new supporting cast on the book. Conway gives Martin a whole new supporting cast… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 40 (October 1985)

For the first time in a while–maybe ever–Conway dedicates over half the issue to Ronnie. He’s in trouble at school because he did too well on his final exams. He and Martin figure… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 39 (September 1985)

Even though Conway tries a few things, the issue doesn't work out well. He's got both Martin and Ronnie playing detective, with a transformation into Firestorm a way for them to get out… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 38 (August 1985)

If it weren’t for the lousy inks from Akin and Garvey, this issue would be rather strong. It’s not wholly successful, but it does have Conway trying new things with the series. Martin… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 37 (July 1985)

Not a good issue. Joey Cavalieri fills in on writing the main story, which has Ronnie’s nightmares informing his Firestorm adventure. It never gets explained how his nightmares could be so important to… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 36 (June 1985)

Whatever magic Kupperberg had been working on the inks is over now. All of a sudden, he’s doing a bad job. The faces in particular. The features aren’t in the right places on… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 35 (May 1985)

Conway doesn’t just address Ronnie and Martin’s partnership as Martin has to move for work, he also makes time to give Ronnie’s father both a personality (or hints of one) and a girlfriend.… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 34 (April 1985)

The Kupperberg inks continue to give Firestorm all the emotion Conway’s scripts have been lacking. Only this issue has some emotion in the script–Ronnie having a talk with ex-girlfriend Doreen (who he jilted… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 33 (March 1985)

Kupperberg sticks around this issue to ink Rafael Kayanan and it’s an interesting result. The figures and composition are still Kayanan’s, but–with a couple exceptions–Kupperberg’s really bringing the personality to the faces. While… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 31 (January 1985)

George Tuska seems an unlikely guest penciller for Firestorm. He makes the whole thing look like a New Gods comic. But it works. Between Tuska's action-based take on the characters and events and… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 28 (October 1984)

And now it's Joey Cavalieri scripting from a Conway plot. The most visible change in the scripting is the personality Cavalieri gives Firestorm's two sides. Martin is dismissive of how Ronnie does things… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 27 (September 1984)

Paul Kupperberg fills in writing the last arc of the Black Bison and Silver Deer arc–which I affectionately call “the attack of the Native American super-terrorists.” Silver Deer proves so evil she even… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 26 (August 1984)

Not much happens this issue past cliffhanger resolution, the villains teaming up with the Soviets and Lorraine and her father doing their every issue recap of his career problems. In some ways, it’s… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 25 (July 1984)

Twenty-five issues into the series and Conway still hasn’t figured out a balance between the superhero stuff and the regular people stuff. Ronnie and Martin get no more time this issue developing their… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 24 (June 1984)

Even with some very questionable character design, a big action finale without any setting and a way too cramped issue in terms of panels, the issue is a considerable success. Conway takes some… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 23 (May 1984)

Conway edits himself on Firestorm, which might by why no one told him having the female businessperson use “she” instead of “one” (referring to a hypothetical lawyer) sounds both sexist and dumb. Evil… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 22 (April 1984)

Sal Trapani inking Pat Broderick. I don’t even know where to start with the result… somehow the people look better than the superheroes, which isn’t how Broderick pencils usually work. Trapani inks them… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 21 (March 1984)

There’s some more Killer Frost misandry goofiness. But not enough to impair the issue–what’s strangest about Killer Frost as the issue opens is how Conway sets her against another female scientist. He writes… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 20 (February 1984)

Conway gets through most of the issue before the problem becomes clear–he doesn’t have much of a story. He hints at future stories, with Ronnie having girlfriend troubles, Lorraine Reilly (Firehawk has joined… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man 19 (January 1984)

Gene Colan pencilling Firestorm (Rick Magyar inks). It's strange and utterly awesome, with Conway–this issue assisted by wife Carla–sending Ronnie and Martin on more of a detective outing than superhero action. They stumble… Continue reading

The Fury of Firestorm, The Nuclear Man Annual 1 (November 1983)

Strengths and weaknesses. This first Firestorm annual has a bunch of each. Oddly, Conway seems a lot more comfortable plotting out a double-size issue–maybe if all the issues had this much room, the… Continue reading