Daytripper 4 (May 2010)

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This issue should have been the second. Each issue ends with the protagonist’s death. It’s not clear yet whether Brás (the protagonist) is just writing himself obituaries on momental days–he was an obituary writer in his twenties and thirties–or if he’s actually dying at the end of every issue. If he’s writing the obituaries… it’s maybe the most distinctive thing about him.

Until now.

Every issue is also a different age–the first issue, Brás is thirty-two, here he’s forty-one (it’s the first time he’s been older than the age of his first “death”). Moon and Bá make him distinctly unsympathetic here. The character is now haggard and drawn; he lacks the useful enthusiasm he had before. According to the obituary this issue, he’s happy in his life… but he doesn’t seem it.

Then there’s the cruelty he shows to his half sister. It’s particularly shocking.

CREDITS

41; writers and artists, Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Sean Konot; editors, Brandon Montclare, Pornsak Pichetshote and Bob Schreck; publisher, Vertigo.

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Daytripper 3 (April 2010)

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Daytripper, specifically this issue, raises a big question–is the story universal? Does it work if the protagonist isn’t some soulful, devastatingly handsome Brazilian guy. The first issue does, the second issue doesn’t… and I don’t think this issue would work if the protagonist looked like George Costanza.

This issue cuts back on the mystical realism, instead doing an intense relationship depression drama. It’s a fine issue. It also answers, while raising a few more, the question I had at the end of the last issue. Now, instead of having these questions answered next issue, I imagine I will have to wait until the end of the series–they might not even be answered at all.

This issue really gives a feel for the setting, the daily life of the protagonist. There’s a nice, well written scene about coffee. It’s such a calm book, even though it’s almost always chaotic.

CREDITS

28; writers and artists, Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Sean Konot; editors, Brandon Montclare, Pornsak Pichetshote and Bob Schreck; publisher, Vertigo.

Daytripper 2 (March 2010)

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I’m totally confused. Not with the mystical realism aspect–it’s nice to see it in a comic. Movies can’t do it, so it’s traditionally only in fiction. Bá and Moon do a nice job bringing it to the comic medium.

No, I’m confused by the ending. Either something happens or it doesn’t and I’ll need to wait until the next issue to find out and if something did happen, well, it’ll significantly change the way Daytripper works. But I don’t think anything happened.

They get a lot of the setting into the issue here, but also a lot of character. The reader gets to know the protagonist from his behavior, from his conversations, more than anything else. In fact, they have the change for an expository scene–the protagonist catching up with an aunt–but don’t show it.

The sense of dread, regardless of the ending, remains. Daytripper is bright, lush and tragic.

CREDITS

21; writers and artists, Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Sean Konot; editors, Brandon Montclare, Pornsak Pichetshote and Bob Schreck; publisher, Vertigo.

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