I Hate Fairyland 14 (July 2017)

I Hate Fairyland #14

I Hate Fairyland just did something rather unexpected. And it’s hard for Young to do anything rather unexpected because, while everything is somewhat unexpected, that chaos is part of the comic. Gert is reliably chaotic. So for Young to pull off a surprise regarding Gert… it’s a neat move. He also has a phenomenal series of Labyrinth references; including, you know, that Labyrinth David Bowie reference. It’s a great issue.

CREDITS

Writer and artist, Skottie Young; colorist, Jean-Francois Bealieu; letterer, Nate Piekos; publisher, Image Comics.

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War Stories 24 (June 2017)

War Stories #24

Ennis gets downright poetic with this issue. Well, his protagonist gets downright poetic, but Ennis takes the comic along with him. Aira gets beautiful skies to draw, while the protagonist remembers what his new drinking buddy–an Italian enemy flier turned ally and liasion–talks about. It’s detached from the war, but intricately part of it. I’m getting rather curious where Ennis is going with it; it’s a lovely comic.

CREDITS

Flower of My Heart, Part Two; writer, Garth Ennis; artist, Tomas Aira; colorist, Digikore Studios; letterer, Kurt Hathaway; publisher, Avatar Press.

Aliens: Dead Orbit 3 (June 2017)

Aliens: Dead Orbit #3

This issue finally delivers Stokoe action violence with Aliens. There’s not a lot, he mostly goes for the terror of the crew, but it’s also terrorized crew members by Stokoe. This issue is exactly what Dead Orbit has always promised. And it’s still just an Aliens comic. Stokoe needs more room, he needs more pages. He feels too confined. He’s got his visual poetics, very much in line with the original Alien, but he can’t get their pace right. He can pace the action and gore right; there’s just not enough room for both. It’s too bad. But still awesome.

CREDITS

Writer, artist, and letterer, James Stokoe; editors, Rachel Roberts and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

Godshaper 4 (July 2017)

Godshaper #4

It’s a downer of an issue. Spurrier sort of hints at it in dialogue, but then it gets violent and even more depressing. Godshaper is a six issue series, after all, and Spurrier’s got to get things in place for the finale. This issue certainly gets things in order for revealations and dramatic twists; though most of it takes place in a nightclub. Ennay is performing, then musing despondently on life, then it’s time for the action. Goonface does better on the performing and musing than the action–the action’s just too big in too few pages, in too confined a space. But it’s a success. The issue’s a complete bummer.

CREDITS

Writer, Simon Spurrier; artist, Jonas Goonface; letterer, Colin Bell; editors, Cameron Chittock and Eric Harburn; publisher, Boom! Studios.

Sacred Creatures 1 (July 2017)

Sacred Creatures #1

Sacred Creatures seems like a vampire book, but it might end up being an angel book. Angels can be Machiavellianly evil too.

This oversized first issue starts with an introduction to the evil “siblings,” who don’t really resemble each other in a familial sense, which is the first clue to something supernatural. Then there’s the introduction of a regular NYPD detective. Then there’s the introduction to the dorky white guy lead. Then there’s a big flashback sequence explaining what’s going on with the dorky, covered-in-blood, white guy lead. And then there’s a hunky blond priest running around saving the day. And saving the dorky white guy lead from giant possessed cats.

It’s a lot.

And writers Klaus Janson and Pablo Raimondi go all out. They write the heck out of it; they’re really working with the script, covering all their bases. Raimondi draws even more heck out of it. It’s a creater-owned property so Raimondi does have to be cost effective–all of the exteriors are what appear to be computer enhanced (beautifully so) photographs of New York City. At least during the flashbacks. The action’s too exciting to concentrate on backdrops.

Sacred Creatures isn’t the most original or the deepest book, but it’s solidly written and plotted and, more importantly, it’s Raimondi kicking ass on the art.

CREDITS

Writers, Pablo Raimondi and Klaus Janson; artist, Raimondi; colorist, Chris Chuckry; letterer, Tom Orzechowski; editor, Sebastian Girner; publisher, Image Comics.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina 7 (August 2017)

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #7

This issue of Sabrina has almost no Sabrina. None as the lead. Instead, it’s got her dad, Edward, coming back to life in the body of Sabrina’s dead boyfriend, Harvey. It’s a frame for a flashback. You know, while Edward, in Harvey’s body, eats Harvey’s parents.

Because it’s a really gross comic. Aguirre-Sacasa knows Hack can sell the creepiness of the behavior while implication. There’s no need for gore. As horrifying as the visuals might get, Hack’s artwork is always lovely. Especially for the flashbacks, in which Edward appears to be a young Eddie Munster type. It’s downright fun for a while–Aguirre-Sacasa enjoys the less gory content fine, he just always punctuates with gore. And after it’s fun, it starts getting creepier and creepier.

It’s awesome. The creators aren’t trying to recreate the gothic, melodramatic horror comic, they’re just doing a good one.

CREDITS

Witch-War, Chapter One: The Truth about Demonology; writer, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa; artist, Robert Hack; letterer, Jack Morelli; editor, Jamie Lee Rotante; publisher, Archie Comics.

Redneck 3 (June 2017)

Redneck #3

Redneck is just getting better, which is sort of surpising given–while good, Cates didn’t seem too focused on mythology building. Even here, when he lays some of the groundwork for a reveal, it’s subtle. It’s in the dialogue, more for fleshing out characters than exposition; only then it turns out to be a very big reveal at the end with a lot of history. At this point, I’m confident Cates knows where he’s going and probably has a good route to get there.

And Estherren is a great fit for it. I already looked forward to enjoying Redneck, but now I’m anticipating it a lot more.

CREDITS

Writer, Donny Cates; artist, Lisandro Estherren; colorist, Dee Cunniffe; letterer, Joe Sabino; editors, Arielle Basich and Jon Moisan; publisher, Image Comics.

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