Kiss Me, Satan 5 (January 2014)

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I’ve never found Ferreyra’s art to be one of Kiss Me, Satan’s selling points. Gischler’s lunacy was always its brass ring. This issue, however, the art is what makes it work. There’s some good lunacy–Gischler seems to get how to use magic in a violent action story. With actual wonderment no less. But his final reveal is a little predictable.

Only it looses Ferreyra. After four issues of action scenes, Ferreyra finally gets to do the big werewolf battle and he does a great job with it. There are two or three fantastic double page spreads this issue, with Ferreyra moving the action across them. Just wonderful energy.

As for the story? Sadly Gischler doesn’t really have an ending, so he combines a few traditional noir ones. There’s no painful series setup, though they could easily do a sequel.

It’s a good, solid comic, which is just fine.

B 

CREDITS

Writer, Victor Gischler; artist, Juan Ferreyra; colorists, Eduardo Ferreyra and Juan Ferreyra; letterer, Nate Piekos; editors, Shantel LaRocque and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

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Kiss Me, Satan 4 (December 2013)

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I wish Gischler would just take his time. It’s a good issue–lots of nice developments, brisk pace–but in his rush, he leaves out a lot of things he could expand on.

This issue doesn’t just have more information on lead Barnabus Black, it has some comic moments with his angel boss and some funny narration. Gischler overcooks the narration–apparently intentionally to make it feel a little noir–but this time he lets it get humorous. It makes the read much more enjoyable.

And, since one is enjoying him or herself while reading the comic, the reader doesn’t want it to end too soon. Gischler does even worse and skips over to the bad guy and then some other bad guys. He doesn’t focus.

Ferreyra’s art is fine. There are some good moments, some less good. He can’t handle the dramatic scenes as well as the action ones.

B- 

CREDITS

Writer, Victor Gischler; artist, Juan Ferreyra; colorists, Eduardo Ferreyra and Juan Ferreyra; letterer, Nate Piekos; editors, Shantel LaRocque and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

Kiss Me, Satan 3 (November 2013)

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Uh oh, I was supposed to be paying attention to the awkward flirting between the lead character and one of the witches. Gischler tries so hard for chemistry between the two of them it’s nauseating. Actually, the way the girl swoons for the guy reminds of Jeph Loeb’s Superman/Batman.

Otherwise, the issue’s reasonably okay. It’s mostly action, which doesn’t look great in Ferreyra’s somewhat painted art. But the scene has a couple unexpected moments and it moves well, static art or not.

Then comes the stuff with the witches, which works because Gischler writes the old witch lady so well. Ferreyra also renders her perfectly. She carries the second half of the issue. Gischler doesn’t bother giving anyone else as much personality. In the case of the protagonist, that lack of depth is already hurting things.

The series’s quality is evening out lower than I hoped; still, not bad.

B- 

CREDITS

Writer, Victor Gischler; artist, Juan Ferreyra; colorists, Eduardo Ferreyra and Juan Ferreyra; letterer, Nate Piekos; editors, Shantel LaRocque and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

Kiss Me, Satan 2 (October 2013)

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Didn’t the first issue have some really mediocre or bad narration from the protagonist? Gischler doesn’t make that mistake in this issue. It’s a lot of action–actually, I think it’s nonstop action at least for the witches and their mysterious protector.

Gischler goes for humor with the witches and it works. His banter between the protector and the vampire hit woman is a little weak, but it’s still all right. Kiss Me, Satan is interesting in how it’s not too ambitious, Ferreyra’s art isn’t exactly good–he goes for a static painted look–but the comic is rather entertaining nonetheless.

There’s some good, actually nerve-wracking stuff with the lady giving birth to the heir to the werewolf clan. It provides a fine companion to the main fight between the witches and the ninja zombies, which is definitely more for humor.

It’s a pleasant book; tough, but not really.

B 

CREDITS

Writer, Victor Gischler; artist, Juan Ferreyra; colorists, Eduardo Ferreyra and Juan Ferreyra; letterer, Nate Piekos; editors, Shantel LaRocque and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

Kiss Me, Satan 1 (September 2013)

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I can’t believe I’m going to make this complaint–writer Victor Gischler has way too much structure for the first issue of Kiss Me, Satan. At least at the beginning.

He adopts a three act structure for the issue. He introduces protagonist Barnabas Black–apparently some kind of fallen angel trying to get back into Heaven–on the run from some demons. Except Barnabas isn’t the focus of the issue, but the leader of the werewolf pack.

Gischler gets to him and his problems in the second act. The third act is bringing everything together.

The comic is best when Barnabas isn’t around, especially when he’s not narrating. Gischler doesn’t do well with the narration; he makes it all sound hackneyed, but he and artist Juan Ferreyra are able to sell the rest.

Satan’s fast and often funny. But having a boring character for a protagonist’s never a good thing.

B 

CREDITS

Writer, Victor Gischler; artist, Juan Ferreyra; colorists, Eduardo Ferreyra and Juan Ferreyra; letterer, Nate Piekos; editors, Shantel LaRocque and Daniel Chabon; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

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