Robocop 20 (October 1991)

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Who is Andrew Wildman and why has he ruined my Robocop? Regardless of Sullivan relatively slipping, this guy is a joke. His faces are pure amateur. I suppose his figures are a little better.

This issue is a waste of time, but kind of shouldn’t be. It’s a continuation of the previous one–Robocop’s wife and child have been kidnapped, Lewis wants to tell him “how she feels”–but there’s nothing but recaps of those items. It’s all a bridge, but it’s a bridge with its own events going on.

There’s some group of rich guys plotting murders or something. It’s not really important. What’s important is Robocop turning off the robot parts and trying it human.

Under a better writer, it’d be a fantastic issue, because the things Furman’s talking about are interesting, the things he’s investigating.

He’s just not a writer who can make it work in Robocop.

CREDITS

The Cutting Edge; writer, Simon Furman; artist, Andrew Wildman; colorist, Gregory Wright; letterer, Ken Lopez; editor, Rob Tokar; publisher, Marvel Comics.

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Robocop 16 (June 1991)

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Wow, what an issue. The villain has a TV for a head. Luckily, Robocop kills him without thinking much about it and so there won’t be any further appearances by… oh, right, Furman doesn’t even give him a name. Umm… Mr. TV Head.

And then there’s the really stupid part where Furman decides “The Old Man” from the movies doesn’t have a real name, which is maybe the most asinine thing I’ve ever heard. Or if he does have a real name, he doesn’t remember it… right….

The issue’s content–television shows beamed directly into the viewers’ minds–reminds a little of Batman Forever. It’s the first time Furman’s concepts have predated the more known pop culture items. Grant usually had one such item an issue. I guess Furman wasn’t as innovative.

It’s not a terrible comic–art’s pretty weak, but not incompetent–just useless; hard to stay conscious during.

CREDITS

TV Crimes; writer, Simon Furman; penciller, Andrew Wildman; inker, Danny Bulanadi; colorist, Gregory Wright; letterer, Ken Lopez; editor, Rob Tokar; publisher, Marvel Comics.

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