Robocop 3 3 (November 1993)

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Actually, I’ve changed my mind about Nguyen’s art. It’s not, you know, in the artistic sense, any better, but it’s like he’s doing a Mad magazine adaptation here. He’s trying to fit everyone he can into each panel. Heaven forbid Dark Horse had tried some imagination with their Robocop license and turned this one into a six issue limited without all the truncating and maybe dealing with the kissy-kissy between Robocop and his doctor, but in lieu of that approach, they should have done it as a farce. They should have aped the movie, because Nguyen is geared toward it and you get the idea Grant knows the crappy dialogue he’s using from the script is crappy.

I’m kind of glad I stopped reading Dark Horse by this one; I don’t have a negative view of them. I’m sure if I’d spent $7.50 on this dreck, I would have.

F 

CREDITS

Writer, Steven Grant; penciller, Hoang Nguyen; inker, Art Nichols; colorist, Penny Zemaitis; letterer, Clem Robins; editors, Dan Thorsland and John Weeks; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

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Robocop 3 2 (September 1993)

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I always forget how ugly some nineties art can be. Nguyen’s fairly competent, I mean, I can recognize his characters, even if the facial details leave something to be desired and he’ll occasionally layout a panel well, but his Robocop is bulky and gross. It looks like a five year-old’s Robocop, certainly not a sleek, streamlined future machine. Nguyen’s way too expressive for this comic, way too loose, since Grant’s script is completely locked down.

The one moment where the comic is mildly interesting is when Robocop’s new girlfriend seems ready to make out with him. I don’t know if Grant got that from a script or if he came up with it himself, but it’s incredible and it’s a shame they don’t do anything with it. At all. I mean, it’s about as discreet as a daytime soap, but it’s at least interesting.

Otherwise, the comic’s a bore.

C- 

CREDITS

Writer, Steven Grant; penciller, Hoang Nguyen; inker, Art Nichols; colorist, Jim Sinclair; letterer, Clem Robins; editors, Dan Thorsland and John Weeks; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

Robocop 3 1 (July 1993)

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I can’t remember the last time I read a comic book adaptation of a movie–they’re the opposite of the novelization, which expands on the source material (for the most part, since the writers are working with a script, not a final cut)–comic book adaptations truncate everything they can to tell a cohesive narrative. And they sometimes cut too much and don’t make any sense.

This issue makes sense, narratively speaking (the lame dialogue from the film seems right at home in the comic book form and some of the deliveries are far better here than in the actual film), but Grant and Nguyen aren’t pushing any envelopes, they’re cashing checks.

I didn’t figure on Dark Horse (I’d stopped reading their licensed properties by 1993) would do the obligatory crappy movie adaptation, but I was wrong.

The book costs $2.50 and you don’t even get a cool cover. Urgh.

D- 

Writer, Steven Grant; penciller, Hoang Nguyen; inker, Art Nichols; colorist, Chris Chalenor; letterer, Clem Robins; editors, Dan Thorsland and John Weeks; publisher, Dark Horse Comics.

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